Hurricane Planning as Part of Emergency Action Plan

Hurricane Planning is essential to an organization’s emergency action plan. There are five hurricane categories cleverly nicknamed: Cat-1, Cat-2, and so forth. Likewise, there are five hurricane planning categories: prepare, train, respond, recover and learn. Let us journey through those categories in an effort to achieve success with our organization’s continuity of operations.

Prepare

An emergency action plan (EAP) is essential for an organization to respond to any emergency. Does your plan account for hurricanes? Does your organization reside in a geographical area prone to such natural disasters? Proper preparation for natural disasters, such as hurricanes, is a way for your organization to be more proactive towards a safer and healthier workplace. One step to proper preparation is to hold a discussion. Gather your managers, supervisors, and front-line employees to discuss your current plan and check for any necessary additions, changes, or updates needed. How about a chain of communication? Do you have emergency contact information for every employee? How is this information stored? Electronic records can fall victim to power outages while written documents can fall victim to flood waters.

From the CEO to your front-line employees, your chain of communication should be solid and not run the risk of being blown away by catastrophic winds. How about your first aid kits, emergency supplies, and fire extinguishers? Some organizations operate on a 24/7 schedule and, in the event of a natural disaster, would have plans to maintain operations during the event. These plans must include securing the essential necessities for your essential personnel.

Train

Any hurricane action plan is potentially a notorious paperweight if your organization does not take the time to practice the plan with drills or scenario discussions. If your organization has alarm systems – test them. If your organization has automated call or text services – test them, too. Hands-on training will allow your organization to succeed on so many levels, not the least of which will empower your employees to practice new skills and find ways to continuously improve overall. You must remember that employees have their own way of learning. Avoid forcing complicated topics that can destroy an employee’s confidence and above all – destroy your organization’s overall success.

Respond

A hurricane watch indicates storm effects within 48 hours while a hurricane warning indicates storm effects within 36 hours. Unlike other natural disasters, hurricanes are predictable, trackable, and give organizations enough time to respond to the recognized hazards associated with weathering a storm. Organizations should monitor reliable weather information for the latest details. When a hurricane is imminent in your area, organizations should begin securing their facilities and bringing outdoor objects indoors.

Non-essential personnel need to remain at home until it is safe to travel back to work. Essential personnel, especially those who will have to remain on site during a storm, should check their emergency supply kits. Three to five days is key. Three to five days is the amount of supplies you need per employee. Water, food, clothing, and toiletries top the list and should be able to survive a power failure. First aid kits, flashlights, radio, extra batteries, full tank of gas in your vehicle, and extra cash should not be missed. These supplies will reassure essential personnel that their hard work to keep operations going will not fail and business as usual will return sooner rather than later. Once the storm passes, the recovery process follows and organizations need to be ready for a new storm.

Recover

The storm has passed and your facility and surrounding neighbors are without power, covered in fallen trees or worse, and drowning in contaminated flood waters – what next? Keep monitoring reliable weather information for the latest details. Hurricanes tend to strike when the heat is on, so when the power is off, your organization needs to take the necessary precautions against heat-related health problems. Employees exposed to excessive heat can quickly suffer from heat exhaustion or a heat stroke. Employees should stay hydrated and rest frequently. Your organization should recognize the hazard of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning if portable generators are put in place. CO is a colorless, odorless, toxic gas and employees have died from CO poisoning because their generator lacked ventilation needed to avoid tragedy.

Employees should use flashlights, instead of candles, to avoid potential fire hazards. Fallen trees are often dealt with by chain saws. Personal protective equipment and proper procedures are essential for the safety and health of employees involved in chain saw operations. Flooding is especially imminent for those organizations further inland. Health hazards from water contamination, electrical hazards from underground or downed power lines, and safety hazards from wading through flood waters are all associated with flooding. Employees should keep away from flood waters.

Now that power has been restored, debris has been cleared, and flooding has receded – what next? Your facility is up and running, but has your organization returned to normalcy? Coping after a traumatic event and recognizing signs of distress are essential during the recovery process. Your ‘Continuity of Operations Plan’ should include ensuring that every employee’s safety and health is closely monitored.

Every employee needs to take care of themselves, avoid excessive media coverage, and know they can ask for help. Organizations should recognize common signs of distress, such as: energy changes, concentration difficulties, and appetite changes. Recovery can take days, weeks, months, or even years. The emotional toll of hurricanes can easily be overwhelming. Organizations and their employees are on the journey together, so let’s be there for each other. We prepared, responded, and recovered from the storm. What did we learn to survive again?

Learn

Any well executed plan deserves to be reviewed, scrutinized and revised accordingly by any successful organization. Gather your managers, supervisors, and front-line employees again to discuss your plan’s successes and failures. Organizations should consider presenting their findings to their entire workforce. A company lunch or dinner event is a great way to bring everyone together both socially and responsibly. Involving employees everywhere in the learning process will result in the entire organization’s ability to survive the next storm.

Read More

5 Tips to Prevent Workplace Slips, Trips, and Falls

According the US Department of Labor slips, trips and falls account for the majority of accidents that occur within general industry. Typically these types of accidents occur due to a loss of traction between ones shoe and the walking surface or when inadvertent contact with a fixed movable object occurs which may lead to a fall. Most slip, trip and fall incidents are preventable with general precautions and safety measures.

Here are five tips to prevent workplace slips, trips and falls:

  1. Create Good Housekeeping Practices—Plan ahead and know what needs to be done and who is going to be doing what in particular work areas, assign responsibilities, and implement a program that establishes good housekeeping procedures as part of daily routines.
  1. Reduce Wet or Slippery Surfaces–Traction on outdoor surfaces can change considerably when weather conditions change. Such conditions can then affect indoor surfaces as moisture is tracked in by pedestrian traffic. Traction control procedures should be constantly monitored for their effectiveness.
  1. Create and Maintain Proper Lighting—Poor lighting in work areas is associated with an in increase in incidents so always use proper illumination in walkways, stairways, ramps, hallways, basements, construction areas and dock areas and always keep areas around light switches clear and accessible. Repair fixtures, switches, and cords immediately if they malfunction.
  1. Wear Proper Shoes—The shoes employees wear can play a big part in preventing falls. Employees should be expected to wear footwear that is appropriate for the duties they perform.
  1. Control Individual Behavior—Employees should make all efforts to stay alert and pay attention to their actions and their surroundings. Taking shortcuts, not watching where one is going, using a cell phone, carrying materials which obstructs the vision, wearing sunglasses in low-light areas, not using designated walkways and speed are common elements in many on-the-job injuries.
Read More
Get ISNetworld ® Compliance the Fast and Easy Way with 1 Stop

Consequences of Failure To Manage OSHA & Environmental

Failure To Manage OSHA & Environmental Compliance Could Destroy Your Business

Many people will read the title of this video (Non Compliance Could Destroy Your Business) and think “that’s ridiculous, how could non-compliance possibly destroy a business?”  If you’re one of these people, and especially if you’re a small business owner, then maybe you should think again…..

As I explained in part 1 of this 3 part video series which explores the major compliance risks facing small businesses, most small companies who are impacted by EHS regulations really struggle to manage them due to the lack of expertise, time, money and resources that is so prevalent with small companies.

Most small business owners are aware of this challenge, but what many don’t understand are the significant risks and liabilities that that this situation can create not only for their business, but sometimes for them personally if something goes wrong.

These risks and liabilities are major and can include regulatory fines and penalties, from agencies like OSHA, EPA and TCEQ, that can run into the $tens or even $hundreds of thousands of dollars (for example, did you know that the average OSHA inspection results in a $30 – $80,000 fine?), and sometimes civil and even criminal liabilities for the business owner if it can be proven that the owner was negligent in managing their environmental, health and safety compliance requirements.  Criminal negligence can result in civil judgements that can run into the $millions of dollars and even jail time.

It’s not hard to imagine how these situations could potentially destroy a business……

The other major thing that many business owners don’t understand is that these kinds of situations happen every single day across the country, when employees get seriously injured or even killed on the job, or when regulators show up in the lobby unannounced.

Unfortunately throughout my career I’ve witnessed these kinds of devastating scenarios playout with associates who I’ve known personally.  I saw a client go to jail for failing to manage hazardous waste management regulations, another face a multi-million civil lawsuit after a subcontractor was killed, and many face huge regulatory fines and penalties.

My point is that these situations are more common than you think, and could happen to you tomorrow if your company is out of compliance and you put your head in the sand and keep putting-off action.

The good news is that the situation is far from hopeless, and there are simple steps that you can take today to get back on track and on the road towards compliance.  Checkout this video to learn more about these risks and more importantly, what steps you can take today to manage and reduce them.  Push the play button before it’s too late!

Read More

How To Start A Workplace Safety Program

So you’re wondering how to start a workplace safety program at your company and not sure where to begin?  Building an effective health and safety program for the first time is a major undertaking, so it’s important to gain some perspective and understanding of the basic requirements and challenges you’re likely to face along the way, so we’ve created this blog post in hopes of helping you do just that!  Think of this article as an “Introduction to OSHA Compliance 101.”

With that said, let’s get on with it…

High Hazard Industries:

Let’s begin by making sure that your company needs a workplace safety program, because not every company does.  To make a long story short, any company who’s operations exposes their employees to workplace health or safety hazards must take steps to mitigate those hazards by developing and managing a workplace safety program.   Here’s a brief list of common industries that just about always have workplace health and safety hazards:  manufacturing, construction, industrial services, warehousing/distribution, healthcare and even certain retail businesses.

If your company is in one of these industries, then there’s a very high probability that you’ll need to develop and manage an OSHA compliance program and the rest of this blog post describes the fundamentals of what that means.

Workplace Health & Safety Hazards:

So what exactly are workplace health and safety hazards?  Unfortunately, there’s a wide range of health and safety hazards that if not properly managed, can result in serious employee injuries, illnesses and in extreme cases can even lead to death.

Safety Hazards:

Some of the more common safety hazards include falls from heights, struck-by and caught-between, accidental release of hazardous energy (electrical and mechanical), unguarded machinery, chemical burns, fires, and even workplace violence.

Health Hazards:

In addition to these safety hazards, there’s also a long list of health hazards that must be managed too.  These include exposures to toxic chemicals & metals and/or other contaminants such as dust or bodily fluids that can lead to serious health problems.  Then there’s potential exposure to excessive noise levels which can result in hearing loss over time.

So there you have it, we’re off to a good start:  if your company is in a high hazard industry which exposes your employees to potentially harmful health and safety hazards, then you’ll need to develop a workplace heath and safety program to help protect your employees from those hazards.

Sounds great, but what exactly does that mean and how do you do that?

Controlling Hazards:

Ok, so let’s try to simplify things a little.  Think of a workplace safety program as nothing more than a set of “controls” which are put into place to help protect employees from the potential harm posed by workplace health and safety hazards.

Actually, there’s a recommended hierarchy of health and safety controls as follows:

  • Elimination: The best option is to eliminate the hazard if at all possible. for example,  a company could scrap an old and damaged forklift that is no longer safe to operate.
  • Substitution: Substitute the hazard with something less hazardous. For example, a company could replace a hazardous chemical with a non-hazardous chemical.
  • Engineering controls: Machine guards to protect from pinch points, rotating parts, etc.
  • Administrative controls: Use of safety policies and procedures, employee safety training, rotating employees to reduce excessive exposure to loud noises etc.
  • Personal protective equipment: Safety glasses, hard hats, steel toed boots.

Notice that PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) is at the bottom of the list.  PPE should be considered the last line of defense only after all other control options have been considered.

There’s much more to learn about this subject, but this should give you a good idea of what health and safety controls consist of.  Again, each of these controls are intended to help mitigate the risks associated with workplace health and safety hazards.

OSHA Compliance:

In order to help employers manage health and safety issues, the Occupational Safety & Health Administration, or OSHA, has developed a series of Standards, each of which is designed to address most of the major hazards that exist in the workplace.  For example, there’s a standard for fall hazards (Fall Protection), chemical hazards (Hazard Communication), noise hazards (Hearing Conservation), respiratory hazards (Respiratory Protection), forklifts (Powered Industrial Trucks) and even standards to address toxic metals like lead.  Each of these standards contain and specify various controls which are intended to help mitigate specific health or safety hazards.

Think of OSHA compliance as a “prevention program” which mandates that impacted employers manage these standards, and their associated controls, to help prevent workplace injuries and illnesses.

Let me give an example of an actual OSHA standard to help illustrate the point.  The OSHA standard which addresses chemical safety, is called Hazard Communication (don’t ask me where they got this name, because I have no idea!).  The standard addresses all of the various hazards posed by chemicals, including burns, fires, health impacts, etc.  The primary controls included in this standard are as follows:

  • Safety Data Sheets, aka SDS’s (formerly known as MSDSs) which spell out all of the hazards associated which every chemical known to man.
  • Labeling: Manufacturers and employers must properly label chemical containers in order to communicate the hazards associated with the chemical (fire, burns, toxicity, etc.).
  • Employee Training: The primary purpose of training is to educate workers on how to read and understand SDSs, safely handle chemicals, properly label chemical containers and how to dawn and doff Personal Protective Equipment.
  • Personal Protective Equipment (“PPE”) needed to protect workers from chemical hazards such burns, inhalation, etc. PPE includes things like gloves, safety glasses, respirators, etc.

The idea being that if an employer implements and manages all elements and controls included in the Hazard Communication standard, then their employees should then be protected from the various hazards presented by the chemicals they use.  Of course no standard is perfect, nor are people, so there’s obviously no guarantee that all future chemical injuries will be prevented, but at least the basic hazards and risks have been addressed.

Keep in mind that OSHA hasn’t developed standards to address ALL workplace health and safety hazards, only the most common and risky ones.  For all other hazards, OSHA has a “catch- all” called the General Duty Clause which basically states that employers must identify and control any other recognized hazards, in order to protect their employees from potential harm.  A simple example might be tearing down an old, wind damaged shade awning that employees stand under for smoking breaks, because the employer realizes that it could collapse at any time.

More on OSHA Compliance:

It’s worth pointing out that OSHA standards are only designed to address “baseline” hazards and risks, and that many of their standards and laws were developed way back in the early 1970’s and haven’t been updated since.  As a result, companies are always advised to go “over and above” OSHA standards by referencing and following guidance from other more up to date health and safety agencies such as National Safety Council, ANSI, etc.   Having said that, it’s tough enough for most small businesses to achieve OSHA compliance, so it’s always best to start there, and then worry about going “over and above” later down the road.

It’s also worth pointing out that OSHA standards are Federal laws that all impacted employers must follow or face the consequences.  Companies who fail to do so face major fines and penalties that can run into the $tens and even $hundreds of thousands of dollars, and  potential criminal liabilities if employees get killed as a result of employer negligence.

Which OSHA Standards Apply to Your Company?

At this point, you might be wondering how to determine which OSHA standards apply to your operations?  And this question leads us to revealing the first major step that any company needs to take in order to begin the process of implementing an OSHA health and safety compliance program.  And that first step is to conduct a health and safety audit or assessment of your company to: 1) determine which workplace hazards are present in your operations, which will then 2) determine which OSHA Standards apply to your business.

Ideally, the end result of a solid health and safety compliance assessment will provide a “roadmap to compliance” which spells out exactly what a company needs to do in order to achieve and manage their OSHA compliance requirements.

Correcting Health & Safety Hazards:

A good, comprehensive OSHA compliance audit not only identifies all relevant hazards, but also itemizes all violations and recommended corrective actions for each.  These corrective actions will include reference to relevant OSHA standards and the specific controls and elements that are required to abate the violation such as engineering controls, written procedures, training, testing, PPE, etc.. The audit would also address other “administrative” deficiencies and requirements such as record keeping (ie: OSHA 300 logs) and reporting requirements.

Typically, the first step after completing a health and safety audit is correcting any and all physical hazards identified in the workplace, since these often pose the greatest immediate risk to employees.  These hazards include things like machine guarding issues, faulty extension cords, defective ladders, unlabeled chemical containers, lack of fall protection, etc.

Your Health & Safety Manual:

While correcting these physical hazards, it’s a good idea to begin working on the next major project which is developing your customized health and safety manual.  This document will contain all of the specific OSHA standards which apply to the company as well as assigning key roles, etc.  This document essentially becomes the company’s “safety bible” and spells out exactly what the company needs to do in order to implement and manage their workplace safety program.

To give you a better idea of what a safety manual might contain, let’s take a typical manufacturing company as an example.  Such a manual might contain the following standards:  Hazard Communication, Ladders, Personal Protective Equipment, Lockout/Tagout, Respiratory Protection, Emergency Action Plan, Fall Protection, Cranes and Hoists, Hearing Conservation, Powered Industrial Trucks and maybe more.

On a related note, many companies make the mistake of downloading a generic safety manual which will normally contain information and standards that don’t necessarily apply to that business.  Again, the manual must be customized to your company’s specific operations and hazards!

More on Employee Safety Training:

This blog post wouldn’t be complete without taking a closer look at OSHA health and safety training requirements because this is one of the toughest requirements to comply with, especially for small businesses.

Again, just about all OSHA standards contain employee training requirements designed to help make employees aware of workplace health and safety hazards and how to avoid and manage them.  Conducting effective and comprehensive training is essential to the success of any workplace safety program, yet it’s one of the toughest controls to manage and therefore one of the most commonly cited violations.

Why is health and safety training so tough to manage?

  • Training must be customized to your operations: Many companies make the mistake of using generic videos or on-line resources.  Technically this is a violation of OSHA standards, because training must be customized to address the specific hazards present in a company’s operations.
  • Trainer must be competent: Companies who are serious about managing OSHA compliance will conduct live training sessions using competent trainers who understand the technical aspects of each standard, can engage their employees, and can answer employee questions. Many companies make the mistake of tasking managers and supervisors who lack the qualifications and experience to adequately train employees, which often ends up being a waste of time.
  • Training is time consuming: most training topics take between 30-60 minutes to properly train, and some topics take much longer.  Many companies make the mistake of believing that 10-15 minute “tailgate topics” are sufficient to meet OSHA standards, but they’re not.
  • Frequency requirements: OSHA requirements that some topics only be trained once, but many have annual training requirements. Even though not all topics are required to be trained annually, OSHA recommends that all topics be trained annually.
  • Employee turnover: Since most companies have employee turnover issues, and since OSHA requires that all impacted employees get trained, training becomes a never ending process for most companies.

Add it all up, and it’s clear that OSHA training is an expensive and inconvenient undertaking.  And if all of these challenges aren’t tough enough to deal with, employers must also commit to pulling employees off the production line to get trained.  This results in added payroll costs, production delays and other related disruptions.

Summary: Managing OSHA Compliance Is A Never Ending Process

Never forget that each of OSHA’s standards contain an extensive list of controls and elements that employers must implement and manage on an ongoing basis.  These controls include ongoing employee training, conducting evacuation drills, developing equipment specific LOTO procedures, conducting and documenting hazard assessments, health testing and the list goes on.  Many companies make the mistake of drafting their health and safety manual only to put it on the shelf to collect dust. Remember, this is your companies “safety bible” and spells out exactly what now needs to be managed on an ongoing basis in order to maintain OSHA compliance.

In addition to the requirements we’ve already discussed, the company must manage additional “administrative requirements” including their OSHA 300 logs (injury and illness records), record keeping and reporting requirements, as well as conducting routine inspections to identify and correct physical hazards which have a nasty way of popping up over and over again.  The company must also manage an internal enforcement program to ensure that employees follow safety rules, such as wearing PPE.

Risks & Liabilities For Failing To Manage OSHA Compliance:

It’s a lot to keep up with, but failure isn’t an option.  These are Federal laws that impacted companies must follow or risk major risks and liabilities including serious employee injuries, surprise OSHA inspections that can result in fines and penalties that can run into the $tens or even $hundreds of thousands of dollars, criminal liabilities if a fatality occurs as a result of employer negligence ($250,000 fine and up to 6 months of jail time), and then there are civil liabilities that can result in $multi-million settlements if an employee get seriously injured as a result of employer negligence.

Companies who fail to manage workplace safety face additional liabilities & risks including lost money, lost business, higher insurance costs, damaged company reputation & PR nightmares, legal costs, increased employee turnover, embarrassment and more.  It’s estimated that US companies lose $140 billion every year in combined direct and indirect costs associated with workplace injuries and illnesses.

What Now?

If you’re feeling a bit overwhelmed and confused at this point, don’t feel bad because you’re definitely not alone especially if you own or work for a small business.  Small companies are at greatest risk because they almost always lack the time, money, resources and internal expertise needed to manage all of the complicated aspects of OSHA compliance.

Like any major project, it’s best to map out your plan, assign key roles and then take it one step at a time through to completion.  As we stated earlier, the first step is to conduct a health and safety assessment of your workplace to determine which health and safety hazards exist and therefore which OSHA standards will apply to your company and safety program.  This isn’t necessarily as easy as it sounds, and requires an experienced and qualified professional to get it done correctly.

We specialize in helping small companies manage environmental, health and safety compliance. 

Read More

6 Things You Should Know Before Hiring A Safety Consultant

In today’s marketplace, there is no shortage of “consultants” willing to share their advice for a fee.  But when it comes to your worker’s safety, there are a few things you should know about him or her before you write them a check.

  1. Academic Qualifications – Academic qualifications are important and, as a result, degree programs in safety have become more prevalent in the last decade.  But just because your prospective consultant has a degree in safety doesn’t mean they are a good fit for your company. Of greater relevance is “real-world” experience and results. Look for consultants who have both education and experience.
  2. Professional Organizations & Memberships – This is another potentially confusing area for the average business owner / decision-maker. While some organizations and professional safety designations such as ASSE and CSP are highly reputable and require documented credentials for membership, many are latecomers with questionable standards.  Look for certifications that don’t just require the candidate to sit through a class or pay an application fee to receive a credential.
  3. On-the-Job Experience – Look for evidence that the consultant has previously dealt with problems similar to yours through their previous work history. A capable safety consultant can easily transition among many different industries in applying sound principles of safety management.  Does their experience indicate satisfactory knowledge of both the technical aspects of safety management as well as the “human” factors?
  4. Clients & References– Who are their clients? Are they known to you? Are they established companies? Don’t hesitate to ask for contact names and phone numbers for current (and former) clients. Avoid placing undue weight on any single recommendation. Seek a balanced, overall assessment of the previous work. A great indicator of a valuable safety consultant is when a former employer becomes a current client.
  5. Will they solve your problem? – Certainly, there are never any guarantees. In fact, one should be extremely wary of the safety consultant who “guarantees” that his work will produce a given dollar result.  Explain your problem thoroughly and listen closely to the answers. Do the answers appear to match your needs? Do they speak plain English or do they frequently fall into jargon? If you can’t understand what they’re saying, what good is their advice? Anyone can recite passages from OSHA Standards. The true skill is in understanding and applying them to a client’s individual circumstances.  A competent consultant will explain safety requirements in everyday language and be able to clearly communicate the ways that compliance can benefit your business.
  6. Finally, Insurance – The professional safety consultant cares enough about his business (and the client’s) to protect it with, at a minimum, $1,000,000 of professional liability and $1,000,000 of general liability coverage. He will willingly produce certificates of insurance as evidence of this.  Please note that legitimate certificates are sent directly from the insurance carrier to the client, NOT provided by the consultant. Anyone with a copy machine and a bottle of “white-out” can phony-up certificates of insurance.
Read More

Contractor’s Guide To ISNetworld® Compliance

GETTING STARTED

About ISNetworld®

ISNetworld® is a data management company that offers verification services for large companies who contract with numerous suppliers. By contracting with ISNetworld®, these companies outsource the review and verification of safety, insurance and other requirements.

How it works:

  • If you are a supplier to one of these companies, called “owner-clients”, you will have to pay a fee to join ISNetworld®
  • You submit your safety programs, insurance policies, and other requested documentation.
  • ISNetworld® issues you a Dashboard Grade

The Dashboard Grade is critical to your continuing to be eligible to perform work for your owner-client, and ISNetworld® Compliance is what keeps your grade high. By following the steps outlined in this guide, you will be able to maintain a high Dashboard Grade.

Your Company Information

The first step to tackling ISNetworld® compliance, once you have your account set up, is to gather your company information. It is very helpful to have the following documents at your finger tips before you begin.

  • Your OSHA 300 and 300A forms for the last 3 years
  • Experience Modification (“EMR”) letters from your workers’ compensation insurance company for the last 3 years
  • Employee hours worked, including overtime, for each of the last 3 years
  • Average number of employees for each of the last 3 years
  • Your NAICS number (Tip: It is critical that you get this right because the safety requirements that apply to you are determined in large part by your NAICS number)
  • Your insurance certificates
  • Your written safety programs
  • Training documentation for your employees, both formal and informal

Once you have gathered all of these documents, you are ready to tackle the next step, the Management Safety Questionnaire.

THE QUESTIONNAIRE

 

Tips for Filling Out the Questionnaire

This is a very important part of the ISNetworld® compliance process, because how you answer the questions will determine what requirements will apply to you. There are 2 types, the general questionnaire which is applicable to all companies and a second questionnaire that is specific to each owner-client.

  • Block out 4-8 hours to complete this process. It takes some time to go through all of the questions and you do not want to rush and make mistakes
  • The questionnaire will ask specific questions about your company’s safety policies
  • Be truthful and accurate in your responses
  • Tip: Make sure the information you enter into the questionnaire matches the documentation you are submitting. Otherwise it will be kicked back.

The questionnaire must be submitted initially when you first join ISNetworld®, and you must update it every quarter.

INSURANCE VERIFICATION

Tips for the Insurance review process

One of the areas of ISNetworld® compliance that causes a lot of headaches for our clients is the insurance verification process,. Each owner-client has specific liability insurance requirements, and you will be notified of them after you enroll in ISNetworld® and complete your preliminary questionnaire.

The insurance verification process is very strict and you should carefully review your certificates of insurance before submitting them to ISNetworld®. Common reasons for rejected certificates of insurance include:

  • Company names were misspelled due to to typographical errors, or were truncated
  • Company address was not listed correctly on the certificate
  • The name of the contractor on the registration with ISNetworld® did not exactly match the name on the insurance certificate
  • The insurance questionnaire was not answered correctly
  • Requirement to notify owner-operator of policy cancellation was not expressly stated on the certificate of insurance
  • Missing policy types
  • Inadequate policy limits
  • Language of waiver of subrogation did not exactly match the requirements

Your insurance agent should be able to work with you to make sure all of this information is accurately reflected in the certificate of insurance. ISNetworld® allows insurance agents to log in directly to the site and with your permission, upload insurance certificates on your behalf. This can be a great way to expedite the process.

 

EMR & OSHA 300 INFORMATION

Reporting Requirements

EMR (Experience Modification Letters) – These letters are issued annually by your workers’ compensation insurance agent. The main thing to watch out for when submitting these into ISNetworld® is to make sure you are inputting them in the appropriate drop box for the previous 3 years. This is the most common reason EMRs are rejected. ISNetworld® usually reviews these within a week of submittal.

OSHA 300 Forms – These are straightforward to submit, assuming you have them. The biggest obstacle our clients run into with respect to this requirement is that they have not met this requirement on an annual basis and need to go back and file them for prior years. Accuracy and completeness is key here. ISNetworld® will reject any forms with missing information or any forms that are not consistent with the information entered into the MSQ.

SAFETY PROGRAM VERIFICATION

Best Practices

When working with our clients on their ISNetworld® Compliance, we find that many of them have problems with their safety programs. Many contractors purchase cookie cutter safety plans online just to be able to submit them to ISNetworld® but the plans are never actually properly customized to reflect their actual operations or even implemented. This practice, while it may help you pass your initial review with ISNetworld®, is not a good idea for the success of your company in the long run.

  • Figure out the safety requirements that are imposed by the owner operator you are seeking to get qualified with and compare your existing safety programs against the requirements. You are basically doing an internal audit to make sure your programs meet all of the requirements.
  • Make a list of the areas where you have gaps and determine what corrective actions are needed to ensure ISNetworld® Compliance. It is important not to misrepresent training records or documents just to get through this step.
  • Determine what safety programs are missing or need to be amended to comply with ISNetworld® requirements. Or if you have the necessary programs, make sure you document the implementation of these plans.
  • Make sure the safety programs you develop for submittal to ISNetworld® accurately reflect your company’s operations and address the relevant hazards. A cookie cutter plan downloaded from the internet can be a good starting point but will need to be carefully reviewed and customized to fit your company.
  • Make sure you actually implement the safety programs you submit to ISNetworld®. A safety program that is just on paper does not do you or your employees any good, and could end up hurting your company. You may be audited by the companies you do business with and they will need to see evidence that any required safety programs or training were actually implemented by your company.

If you are strapped for time and need help making all of this happen, you may want to hire a safety consultant to assist you with this process. Many safety consulting firms offer turn-key safety management services and can support you on a monthly basis to make sure your company has the right safety programs to comply with ISNetworld® and that these safety programs are actually implemented so your employees stay safe.

TRAINING VERIFICATION

Depending on the type of work your company does, your owner-client may impose training requirements for your employees. You will need comply with these requirements and upload documentation to verify that the training took place. ISNetworld® will verify your training records to make sure they meet the owner-client requirements as part of the training verification process. Acceptable training records must include the following information:

  • Date of training
  • Signature of employees who attended
  • Subject matter or type of training
  • Signature of trainer Training records are usually reviewed within a week of submittal

OTHER REQUIREMENTS

Be prepared to meet additional requirements from the owner-clients from time to time. Examples of these may include:

  • Site tracker requirements
  • Site identification cards
  • Other signed contractor documents
  • Contractor orientation is commonly required by owner-client before employee can enter on jobsite.

These generally don’t affect your Dashboard Grade that much, but it is important that you complete them.

ONGOING MONITORING OF YOUR ACCOUNT

Getting set up properly and getting a good rating up front isn’t enough. Your account needs to be monitored at least monthly to make sure that there are no issues affecting your grade, such as new OSHA citations.

GETTING HELP

Choosing a Safety Consultant

If you find that keeping up with ISNetworld® is simply too much for your limited office staff, you may want to consider seeking outside help from a consultant. A qualified safety professional can take over this task for you, and keep you in compliance with ISNetworld® and all other applicable safety laws and regulations.

If you are looking for help with ISNetworld® compliance, a quick google search will yield the names of numerous companies offering downloadable safety programs and monitoring services to assist you. But how do you know if these companies are qualified to help you with both ISNetworld® and OSHA safety requirements? And how do you choose one among the many choices?

Here are some tips and red flags to look out for:

  • Avoid ISNetworld® consultants who only provide cookie cutter, downloadable safety programs and no real safety advice. Although a cheap downloadable program may solve your ISNetworld® compliance problem in the short run, it is not enough. A professional safety consultant will provide customized safety plans that fit your company’s operations and will advise you on implementation so that the ultimate goal of a clean safety record for your company is achieved. If you are audited, the cookie cutter plan that was never implemented will not be sufficient to keep your company in compliance, so it’s best to do it right the first time.
  • Check your consultant’s professional safety credentials and certifications. A certification indicates that your consultant meets the highest standards for professionals in the safety industry. Two of the most highly regarded certifications in the safety industry are the ASP (Associate Safety Professional) and the CSP (Certified Safety Professional). An individual with an ASP certification has met an experience requirement, an academic requirement, and has passed the first of two examinations leading to the CSP credential, the Associate Safety Professional (ASP) examination. The CSP certification marks individuals who have met educational and experience standards and passed rigorous examinations validated against the practice of hundreds of safety professionals. For more information on these safety certifications, see the website for the Board of Certified Safety Professionals.
  • Make sure you understand the scope of the services to be provided. There are many levels of ISNetworld® consulting available in the market place. Some companies just provide data maintenance and document processing services, which means that they simply take care of drafting cookie-cutter safety programs and uploading them into ISNetworld® for you. Monitoring of your information is usually available for a quarterly or annual fee. Other companies will offer enhanced safety services on a monthly or quarterly basis (for example, safety meetings, OSHA representation, and accident investigations), and some will offer turn-key, full service safety management services for your company. Make sure you understand what you are getting when you sign on with your consultant, and that they are qualified to provide the level of support your company needs.
  • Check your potential consultant’s references and reputation. Referrals from your industry peers are a great source of names of potential consultants, as well as local safety organizations, such as your local chapter of the American Association of Safety Engineers. If you are unsure, don’t hesitate to ask for client names and references. Your ISNetworld® compliance grade directly impacts your company’s bottom line, so make sure the consultant you are hiring is competent.
  • Remember that safety management is about more than just your ISNetworld® compliance. A good safety consultant can help you understand and comply with OSHA requirements, improve your safety record, and maintain your company’s reputation as a safe company to do business with and work for.

Letting a qualified safety professional handle  your ISNetworld® compliance can help free up your time to focus on what you do best.

Read More

What are RAVS®?

RAVS stands for the Review and Verification Services section of your account. Here, you upload your safety program. Generally, most accounts can have anywhere from 16-40 programs that need to be custom written and submitted for review.

Contractors often assume that RAVS® and safety programs serve the same function in the ISN® compliance process, but in reality they are distinctly different. In the same way that Cliff Notes provide a summary of a book, RAVS provide a brief overview of the content that is contained in a contractor’s safety program.

ISNetworld® requires RAVS® to be submitted as part of the ISN® compliance process, but without a compliant safety program, contractors are still at risk. 1 Stop Compliance can provide RAVS® for contractors based on their safety programs, but is not held liable for the content of contractors’ own safety programs. It is the responsibility of contractors to ensure their safety programs meet industry standards for compliance, and that their employees adhere to the practices outlined in those programs. If you are unsure whether or not your safety program is up to par, Blakeman & Associates can review and suggest revisions or create an entirely new safety program specifically for your company.
Unfortunately, some third-party data providers do not clarify the difference between RAVS® and safety programs and the importance of having them both, which can lead to a misunderstanding of liability.

Read More

I Received an ISNetworld Letter! Now What?

I received an ISNetworld Letter! This suddenly lands in your mailbox: “We are pleased to announce (COMPANY) has recently established a business relationship with ISNetworld® to further enhance our contractor/supplier management program. As a result of this action, contractors/suppliers and their subcontractors performing services for (COMPANY YOU WANT TO KEEP WORKING FOR) are required to become subscribers to ISNetworld®.”  Everyone receives this ISNetworld® Letter if you are being requested to join because of a client. We know there can be many questions as to why you received this letter and what happens from here. After receiving your ISNetworld® Letter we are here to help you through the process of getting ISNetworld® compliant!

Companies and contractors both pay to secure an account with a third-party auditor, such asISNetworld®, PICS® , PEC Premier® , BROWZ, ComplyWorks®, Veriforce, Textura, and others. After establishing an account, the client uploads requirements specific to their companies, projects, and job sites to ensure the prospective contractors post detailed qualifications of their company and employees. If a contractor wants to work for an owner, they must ensure they meet all of the needs of the owner.

Throughout the process, the third-party auditor inspects and validates the documentation uploaded. Common types of documentation and requirements include safety programs, training programs, insurance information, workers’ compensation information, incident statistics, financial stability, and past performance.

Bringing any third party auditor account to a 100% score can be a daunting and time-consuming task.  However, we know this requires time, money, and close attention. But the benefits of properly utilizing a third party auditor more than outweigh the cons!

Read More

Hiring A Safety Consultant For Your ISNetworld® Compliance

If you are looking for help with ISNetworld® compliance, a quick google search will yield the names of numerous companies offering downloadable safety programs and monitoring services to assist you. But how do you know if these companies are qualified to help you with both ISNetworld® and OSHA safety requirements? And how do you choose one among the many choices?

Here are some tips and red flags to look out for:

  1. Avoid ISNetworld® consultants who only provide cookie cutter, downloadable safety programs and no real safety advice.   Although a cheap downloadable program may solve your ISNetworld® compliance problem in the short run, it is not enough.  A professional safety consultant will provide customized safety plans that fit your company’s operations and will advise you on implementation so that the ultimate goal of a clean safety record for your company is achieved.  If you are audited, the cookie cutter plan that was never implemented will not be sufficient to keep your company in compliance, so it’s best to do it right the first time.
  2. Make sure you understand the scope of the services to be provided.  There are many levels of ISNetworld® consulting available in the market place.  Some companies just provide data maintenance and document processing services, which means that they simply take care of drafting cookie-cutter safety programs and uploading them into ISNetworld® for you.  Monitoring of your information is usually available for a quarterly or annual fee.  Other companies will offer enhanced safety services on a monthly or quarterly basis (for example, safety meetings, OSHA representation,  and accident investigations), and some will offer turn-key, full service safety management services for your company.  Make sure you understand what you are getting when you sign on with your consultant, and that they are qualified to provide the level of support your company needs.
  3. Check your potential consultant’s references and reputation.  Referrals from your industry peers are a great source of names of potential consultants, as well as local safety organizations, such as your local chapter of the American Association of Safety Engineers.  If you are unsure, don’t hesitate to ask for client names and references. Your ISNetworld® compliance grade directly impacts your company’s bottom line, so make sure the consultant you are hiring is competent.
  4. Remember that safety management is about more than just your ISNetworld® compliance. A good safety consultant can help you understand and comply with OSHA requirements, improve your safety record, and maintain your company’s reputation as a safe company to do business with and work for.
Read More

Labor Law Changes in 2018

2018 is just around the corner and with it changes in labor laws in many states, now is the time for employers, business owners, & HR compliance professionals to educate themselves on upcoming labor law changes that take effect 1/1/2018. Below we have a list of the different states and which laws that are changing.

The most expected update to occur is state minimum wage rates. Since the Federal Minimum Wage hasn’t changed since 2009, most states have issued their own minimum wage laws to match the cost of living in their areas. Many highly populated states increase their minimum wage rates the first of every New Year. Minimum Wage posters are one of the required posters that come included in the All-In-One 2018 Labor law Poster which also includes OSHA, Paid Sick Leave, Discrimination, Workers’ Compensation and all additional mandatory posters applicable to your state.

Alaska: Minimum Wage
Arizona:  Earned Paid Sick Time(new posting) & Minimum Wage
California: Transgender Rights in the Workplace(new posting)
Colorado: Minimum Wage
Connecticut: Pregnancy Discrimination & Accommodation(new posting) & Discrimination
District of Columbia: Minimum Wage
Florida: Minimum Wage
Louisiana: Earned Income Credit
Maine: Minimum Wage
Massachusetts: Pregnant Workers Fairness Act
Michigan:  Discrimination Posting & Minimum Wage
Minnesota: Minimum Wage
Missouri: Minimum Wage
Montana: Minimum Wage
Nevada: Domestic Violence Victims (new posting)
New Jersey: Minimum Wage
New York: Minimum Wage & Paid Family Leave(new posting)
Ohio: Minimum Wage
Oregon: Minimum Wage
Rhode Island: Minimum Wage
South Dakota: Minimum Wage
Vermont: Pregnancy Accomodation
Washington: Minimum Wage & Paid Sick Leave

With all these changes means that new Labor Law posters are required in the work place. Make sure to contact 1 Stop Compliance today to order your new updated Labor Law posters!

Read More